For the sake of advancing research into the structure of the atom, I hereby present a theory. For the sake of copyright, I do not claim any ownership of the information that follows. I want this information to be public.

The path of the electron can be described with right-angled triangles and numbers, with a bit of Fibonacci thrown in.

Take the Nautilus shell. A Fibonacci spiral can be seen in this construct. Now, consider how everything in nature scales up and down in a similar fashion – stars and atoms share traits. We’re all mostly carbon. So why can’t an atom be built on the same lines? Imagine if we could predict the path of an electron, what is possible.

How do we predict the path? We freeze the atom. As it cools, the electron slows down.

Let’s begin with the spiral. An electron moves in a spiral pattern from the nucleus of the atom to the outside, and then when it gets too far out, the nucleus draws it back inside again, changing the direction of the electron. It comes back on the same path, always in a spiral pattern. When it gets to the nucleus, it gives off energy, and changes direction again.

The spiral is described in a series of 3-4-5 Pythagorean triangles, connected on the hypotenuse. Draw a 3-4-5 triangle, and on the 5, create a larger triangle of the same perspective where the 3 lies on the 5 and is the same length. Do the same with a new bigger 3-4-5, where the 3 sits on the hypotenuse of the smaller triangle. As you connect these triangles, a spiral shape will develop that resembles a Fibonacci spiral.

(See this link for a representation of this.)

The speed of the electron is also predictable. It is a ratio of 1:144 000.

The speed and direction of an electron is therefore predictable.

I have proven (if this theory cannot be disproved) that Free Will does not exist.

In case you’re wondering what happens if you freeze atoms to the point that electrons stop spinning, go watch that schlock film “The Day After Tomorrow”, and combine it with “Terminator 2: Judgement Day”. Everything freezes to the point where it becomes so brittle that it shatters. Now consider being able to build a machine that slows down electrons so that it can separate molecules into their constituent parts.

The mind boggles.